Featured

  • How much time should our kids spend with media?

    Despite all of the new technology, many parents still seem to have few rules about use of media by their children and adolescents. In a recent study, two-thirds of children and teenagers reported that their parents have “no rules” about time spent with media. (Wow!)

    How much time should our kids spend with media?
  • Supporting your children through a divorce

    Young children can become temporarily more dependent and regressive in behaviour, while adolescents may become more insecure, withdrawn or even aggressive in response to the change.

    Aggression may be aimed at a parent or sibling. Alternatively, behavior change may come up at school towards peers, teachers or in schoolwork.

    Supporting your children through a divorce
  • Taming Tantrums

    Parents will often ask, “How can I stop my child from becoming a brat?” The good news is that if you are even concerned about this, chances are that your child won’t turn into one. Naturally, every child will have bad days or times when their behaviour is less than appealing due to illness or tiredness. What parent hasn’t had their child screaming for his favourite treat in the confectionery aisle at the local store at some point or another? Am I alone here?

    Taming Tantrums
  • There are never ‘two sides’ to child abuse!

    (Although not strictly about teens, this post on child sexual abuse is an important topic to raise. For some children, the first time they make a disclosure is in their teen years.) We were sitting on my bed. I will never forget the uncontrollable sobbing. Anguish. Pain. Heartbreak. Relief. Relief that ‘the secret’ was exposed at last. Although my friend was in her early teens, she had carried this terrible knowledge around for too many years. A knowledge borne out of experience. Experience Read more [...]

    There are never ‘two sides’ to child abuse!
  • Talking to children about ‘stranger danger’ – without instilling fear

    Fear reactions to media are quite common for young children in particular, even from descriptions alone. A survey of 5-12 year olds indicated that 37% of the children surveyed, were scared by something they saw on the news, and they were most often affected by stories of stranger violence. Emotional stress results, in part, when a child cannot give meaning to dangerous experiences.

    Talking to children about ‘stranger danger’ – without instilling fear